Thursday, September 18, 2014

Happy Fall Simple Wreath

Fall is my favorite season.  I was born in October.  I held my beautiful son for the first time in October.  After 11 years of  infertility and 2 year wait to adopt.  It was a long journey but it was the sweetest experience to meet our son, Grady and welcome him into our little family.  Words can't express what a joy he is in our lives.  People often ask "Don't you think he needs a sibling?".  My response is "It's better to have one than none."


Okay, I digress!  I love to create, paint, and craft.  I have given up on perfection.  I don't want a perfect wreath, the perfect life, or perfectly painted piece of furniture.  Being perfect is so overrated and exhausting.  I find creating makes my soul happy.  I like being imperfect.  I like the look of handmade.  I like simple projects.  I didn't want to spend any money on this.  I used what I had in my craft room.  


I took 2 yards of fabric and  cut them in 2" x 12" strips. I choose a orange polka dot fabric.   I used a flat metal wreath that you can find at at a craft store.  I tied each strip around the wreath and double tied it.  It took about 2.5 hours to wrap the wreath.  I didn't watch TV one night.



I then made a large bow out of Chevron Burlap. I hot glued it to the wreath. 



 I dug through my scrapbook stuff and found the buttons and sticker letters.   I love the whimsical look of the wreath.


 Navy Blue Door with the Orange Wreath looks great.  This wreath will last through Thanksgiving. 

Happy Fall Y'all! 

Debbi
  



How I Dyed My $25 Thrift Store Couch

I bought this hide-a-bed couch for my son's room.  We've been updating his room to a young man's hang out.  I had been seeing on Pinterest an easy way to dye furniture with a spray bottle.  I thought it made sense and looked simple.


I found the couch at a local thrift store.  I left it outside in the heat of  Utah and covered it in plastic for about two weeks.  I wanted to make sure no bed bugs or other critters were in the couch.  I didn't need any surprises!!  I then mixed up the RIT Dye in Aqua with hot water. I found the RIT Dye at Walmart in the Laundry isle for $3.00.   I started spraying it.  It only lightly colored the couch.  I was looking for bright color. 
 


I finally took the head of the spray bottle and put in up to the fabric and started saturating it.  2.5 hours later.  I still wasn't done.  It needed to be darker. I thought my hand was going to fall of from pumping so much.  I hand to do something else I didn't want to be out here for two more hours.


I made a large 32 oz tub (butter tub) of double strength solution of dye and hot water.  I got a old paint brush and went to town.  I did 2 more coats. I recommend painting the couch.  It was so much faster and easier.



 I removed the skit around the couch.  It looked a little more Mad Man-ish.  I let dry out in heat for 4 days.  I wanted the heat set it.  After that we used Scotch Gard.




 I need to repair the small tear on the edge of arm.  The hubs is going to add dark wood trim around the bottom of the couch.  It will look more manly.  I probably could have done one more coat.  After it dried there wear a few lighter areas.  Overall it's a big improvement to the light green couch. 


Grady doesn't have a large room.  He wanted that way.  So we had to get creative.  The hubs built him a raised platform pallet bed so he could have room for a couch.  That was Grady's idea.  I will reveal his bed next week.



All that matters is Grady loves it!!  Stay tune to Pallet bunk bed and reclaimed wood closet wall.

Happy Creating,

Debbi



Tuesday, September 16, 2014

How to Spray Paint a Front Door

Happy Fall Y'all.  I love Fall.  The cool mornings, crunchy leaves, and homemade chicken noodle soup.  I wanted to redo my front door.  I was tired of the cream.  I wanted a deep rich color so when I put a wreath on it it would pop.   

I'm a simple gal.  I like projects to be simple but creative.  I started with our front door it has been cream for 13 years.  My door had so many scratches and ding from unloading and loading furniture. 




I choose to us Valspar Premium Finish with Micromist. I would get a even coat that would be smooth.  I wanted  Navy Blue.  Well, I was wrong!!


This is 2 1/2 coats.  The Micromist technology made the spray can narrow and not even.  I've used spray paint for years on different projects.  I was stunned when the door came out looking like this!  The blue was a little off too.  I wanted deeper blue that wasn't bright.  It was awful.  Grady, (my son) said it looks like graffiti.  I agreed.  I couldn't live with that!





We made another trip to Lowe's and they refunded our money.  We were going to try a different brand of paint but couldn't find a navy blue.  Valspar Outdoor was the only one with Navy Blue.  I needed a front door before sundown.  No, I wasn't stressing out!  HaHa!



There is a little bit of streaking.  I had to leave the glass door open because of the glare.  It looks better.  I can live with it.  I love the color.  Coming soon a simple Fall Wreath

Debbi




Thursday, August 14, 2014

Fighting An Invisible Battle

It's been a while since I've last written.  I can't apologize because I'm doing my best.  You see I'm fighting a battle that most of the people around me can't see.  Oh, I know it's real because the person I use to be had boundless energy.  I always a had cheerfulness and excitement about life.  Now a good day is getting out of bed and being upright.  I've mentioned this before here that I suffer with Fibromyalgia.  When I was diagnosed 8 years ago I couldn't even pronounce it.    

For the last 10 years it a battle to get out of bed.  It's a battle to move freely.  It's a battle to be productive.  After 2 days of Vintage Markets this weekend.  I couldn't move.  The fatigue is so severe.  My eyes burn and my eyelids just I can't keep open.  The fatigue hurts.  Feeling the weakness through out my body.  Standing up makes me dizzy and off balance.

Yesterday after 5 days of not showering, I finally showered.  I had to hold on to the wall.  I felt like I was going to fall.  It scared me.  I hung on for dear life.  As soon my shower was complete I got dressed and went back to bed and slept.  The fatigue is like jet lag but by 10 times.  This is not tired this is bone chilling fatigue.  My arms and legs don't work right.  It's feels like your moving in slow motion.  Think of a rerun of the Million Dollar Man and they show him punching his enemy.  My reaction time is off.  This is no movie here but my whole body feels like I'm walking through a thick wall of molasses.  My thoughts are not clear, my body fails me.

The physical pain is unreal.  I ache from head to toe.  The muscles are like a rubber band being pulled to tight almost to the verge of breaking.  My muscles around my fingers, toes, shoulders, legs, hips, elbows, neck, back, just ache for no good reason.  Picture a chicken wing that you pull back the meat to get every piece of it.  That's how my muscles feel around my bones like some thing is trying to pull back the muscles around my bones.

The joints ache and burn.  Some days it feel like a bonfire in my joints.  Hot sweltering heat in my  knees, tail bone, elbows, hips, ankles, fingers.  Where the muscles and joints meet is so tender and sore.

The shooting lighting pain that I have especially in my feet.  It feels like some has a Voo Doo doll that's stabbing me for fun.  Sharp pains that come out of no where.  I also get these shooting pains in my legs, arms, and chest.  Some days I feel pinching pain.  Pinching me so hard I want to cry.

I suffer from short term memory loss.  I can't remember what happen a day or week ago.  I don't know faces of my customers.  I'll be at vintage market and I should remember a lot of my customers I don't.  I try to go back in my mind and try to find a connection and I know there trying to connect with me and I can not remember no matter how hard I try.  I don't remember things my son has done, or his friends or parents of friends.  This is so frustrating.  I use to have a member like a trap door.  I could remember friends and families birthdays, wedding, anniversaries.  I try to remember but it's like staring at a blank book.  Those memories are gone and I can't get them back.  I feel like an idiot at times.

Cognitive I forget how to spell.  I'll be typing and I'll see a word in my head like brave and I'll type Bruce?  I really thought I was typing the right word.  I've never been a terrific spelling but now I can't remember how to spell.  A simple word I won't be able to formulate the letters in my mind to spell it.

This is the invisible battle I've been fighting for years.  When you see me in public you wouldn't know I was fighting this battle.  Yes, and I do mean fight!  I have to battle my body everyday.  I won't stop fighting either.  I'll put up my dukes.  I'll swear if I have too.  There will be days the Fibro wins, but not everyday.

You see I live everyday tattered and worn. I see an old used up piece of furniture and I see me.  Worn down, drawers don't slide, and useless.  I see what they can become there potential. It's is like a diamond in the rough.  A bit of sanding, some paint, new hardware, and so on. 

You may ask doesn't this take you longer?  Why do it?  It's too much work?  Yes, it takes me longer and I have to rely on my hubby to help out with a lot of it.  Yes, it is work.  No, I can turn around 3 pieces a day.  As I work on these pieces I'm healing my soul.  No, it doesn't take my Fibro away.  Being able to create gives me hope for a better day.  I see that I am valuable.  The way I survive this is my putting a little piece of me in to every piece.  That is what keeps me going every day.

As I've talked about seeing each piece of vintage furniture as tattered and torn like me I also see God doing the same in me.  He take me as I'm.  He breathes new life in me.  Just like I do to my work.

This is how I battle everyday but I won't stop fighting.

                                              Debbi
                                       Be Your Own Kind of Beautiful

                                         


Tuesday, June 3, 2014

How To Get a Chippy Finish with Milk Paint Every Time

Sausha, from Sweet Pickins has wrote another excellent tutorial.  Sausha told me about this trick a few months back.  It's has worked every sing time I've used it.  The results are amazing! Without further ado, here is Sausha!

Ive been using shellac for a few years now, clear shellac works perfect for blocking bleed through on painted pieces and is also great for sealing in musty smells on furniture.  It goes on clear and dries super fast.  Its an awesome product with lots of uses.
BUT, about 6 months ago i was playing around as i like to do, and figured out some cool stuff that it does with milk paint.  It was purely by accident as all the best discoveries are!
I’ve been hesitant to post the info because im still experimenting with it – but i think i have enough info to share with ya now :)
DISCLOSURE:  For the most part my shellac trick has worked great on the things im going to tell you about.  BUT, milk paint still has a tendency to do its own thing even with the shellac and i cant guarantee that its going to come out like the examples that i have.  Like i said, ive been using it for about 6 months now and these are my general conclusions.  Please test on your own piece before doing the whole thing!!

………………………………………………….

K – this is what i use….

Zinsser clear shellac.  Its about $7.50 a can and is just in the stain isle at home depot or lowes.  You can also get it in quarts or gallons.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Shellac trick w/milk paint
And this is what i have found….

1.  Using shellac as a “primer” for milk paint

If i have a piece that is really shiny with a smooth finish on it, then i use the shellac rather than using Extra Bond with my milk paint to get a perfect chippy and sometimes crackly finish.  It is normally recommended when painting over something with a high shine to use the extra bond to ensure adhesion, in this case im using the shellac as a “primer” for my milk paint.  The pic below shows an antique dresser with a thick lacquered (or shellacked?) original clear coat and it was pretty shiny.    I sprayed the piece twice with shellac and let it dry in between coats.  The shellac dries pretty quick, so this goes really fast.  I normally just do 2 coats so i can make sure that i have covered the entire surface.
I have found, if i let the shellac completely dry (only about 5 minutes depending on the outside temp) before putting on my milk paint, then i will get the “perfect chippy” look with the milk paint.  If i paint on my milk paint while the shellac is still a bit tacky (over a previously stained piece) then the milk paint will come off in bigger chips.  So it would just depend on the look that your going for.
Now why use shellac rather than just using the Extra Bond?  
 - Because with shellac the milk paint has a tendency to chip because its resisting the surface.  If i added the bond, i most likely wouldn’t get any chipping.  I have found with the shellac i get chipping almost every time when im painting over a previously stained piece.    The shellac also does really cool things with giving a crackly/alligatored finish.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Shellac trick w/milk paint
How do i know i wouldn’t have just got this “chippy” if i skipped the shellac and the Extra Bond?
 - I don’t for sure.  Actually, i do know i wouldn’t have gotten this chippy with the bond because i rarely get any chipping when ive added the bond.  But i know from experience, if i had of just painted this piece with no shellac and no bond, then most likely the paint wouldn’t have adhered as well as it did and i most likely would have gotten bigger “chips” in the paint instead of smaller chipping all over.  I know this because the piece had a high shine to it and wasn’t porous at all, the old finish was in really good shape.  (to see a post about using Extra Bond, click here)
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Shellac trick w/milk paint
This pic below shows a piece when i was experimenting with the shellac and tried both ways on one piece.   I had started painting the piece with extra bond (and no shellac) on the right hand side and you can see that i didn’t get any chipping with the milk paint.  I then sprayed the left hand side with a couple coats of clear shellac and then painted milk paint over it (with no extra bond) and you can see that i got light chipping all over.    The paint still stuck really well overall, but i did get the chipping that i like.  This was a piece from the 70ies with a thick lacquered clear coat, im almost positive that if i skipped the bond and the shellac and just used straight milk paint, all my paint would have just flaked off.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Shellac trick w/milk paint

2.  Shellac over metal with no Extra Bond

I have found that the shellac trick works well with metal too.  I don’t have a finished piece to show of this one, but i will post pics soon.  I just wanted to include this in my findings so far :)
Rather than using the extra bond mixed with milk paint, i sprayed the shellac 1st onto the shiny painted metal, then milk painted and the paint stuck very well, i was really surprised.    My hopes were that i would still get chipping with the shellac over the metal rather then using the extra bond and not getting any chipping.  I’m still experimenting with metal and i only did these couple of pieces.  I need to finish up the project and let you know if i get any chipping!
(piece on the left is sprayed with shellac 1st, painted with no extra bond.  piece on the right is painted with no shellac and no bond, clearly it didn’t stick!!)
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Shellac trick w/milk paint

3.  Shellac over a previously painted piece

When painting over a previously painted piece, i have found that if you spray shellac over the old finish before milk painting,  then you get this amazing crackling!  This has worked for me every time ive tried this so far and i love it!
So far when spraying shellac 1st over an old (or newly) painted finish, i haven’t gotten a ton of chipping, just a lot of crackling which looks really good, especially when dark waxed.
I’ve also noticed that when i spray shellac over previously painted finishes, it seals in that layer of paint and it keeps it from chipping up with the 1st layer of milk paint.  Otherwise, the 1st layer of milk paint if it chipped, would most likely take the old paint finish with it.  Again, it would just depend on the look that your going for.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Shellac trick w/milk paint

4.  Shellac under milk paint with Extra Bond

I had one instance when i used the Extra Bond on a newer piece of furniture and i still wasn’t getting good adhesion on a couple of spots.  I ended up spraying some shellac on the spots and then going back over those spots with milk paint mixed with Extra Bond and the paint stuck really well.  I ended up finding out that my milk paint with the bond wasn’t adhering because there was a thick coat of waxy furniture polish over the whole thing – ugghhh!!!  But the bond in the milk paint along with spraying it with shellac 1st made the paint stick like crazy!
So im thinking that if you had a really “iffy” surface that you were trying to paint (plastic or a high shine laminate) that it may be beneficial to spray the shellac 1st in addition to adding Extra Bond to your milk paint.

5.  Shellac as your final coat over milk paint

One of the great things about milk paint is that you can use any top coat on the market to seal in the paint and protect it from getting dirty.  Shellac is perfect for a top coat and is super durable.  You want to be careful though about using it over whites as the shellac does have a yellow cast to it and can make your white colors look yellow.  I would most likely test in a spot over any color your using it over and make sure you are ok with the final color.  Shellac really deepens and brightens up milk paint and brings out all the multi-tonal qualities that are characteristic of milk paint.

6.  Shellac as a stain/bleed through blocker and odor concealer

Shellac works perfect for blocking bleed through on any piece your going to paint.  If you have a piece that has an old red stain to it that keeps coming through your paint, shellac works really well to block it from coming through.  Even if you have started painting your piece with milk paint and didnt use shellac, you can use shellac between coats of milk paint and the milk paint will still adhere fine.  Normally for strong bleed through, you might need to give it 5-8 coats.  But it dries really quick so it wont take long at all.
Shellac is also great for blocking smelly odors.  It works great for inside of old trunks or dresser drawers.  Just give it a couple coats and it should seal in those old odors and block them from coming through.

………………………………………………

So, in conclusion, i love the shellac under milk paint because it really helps give me that overall chippy look on pieces that i normally would have used the Extra Bond on.  The shellac seems to get me the perfect chippy look but i still get good adhesion on most of the piece.  I will still keep trying it out and trying new things with it and let you know what i find out!!
Post by Sausha
If you haven't been to Sausha's website go now!  She's has been painting for years and has one of the best websites about painting furniture. 

                                                          Be Your Own Kind Of Beautiful, 


                                                                       Debbi

Sunday, May 25, 2014

When, How & Why to add Extra-Bond to Milk Paint

Sausha, from Sweet Pickins Furniture has a great tutorial on Extra Bond.  I’m back with another tutorial on Sweet Pickins Milk Paint – this time we will chat about the Extra – Bond.  We will cover all the whens, whys and hows.  If you have any questions just leave them in the comments so i can address them as others may have the same ones :)
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond

What is it?

Extra – Bond is a water based polymer emulsion.  When added to milk paint, it gives greater adhesion to non-porous surfaces or previously finished pieces.  Its environmentally safe, non toxic and VOC free.  Clean up is easy since its a water based product – just simple soap and water will do.
Basically – it is recommended that if you are going to be using milk paint over a piece that has been previously painted, has an old finish on it (polyurethane, shellac) or will be painting a non porous surface such as glass, metal, laminate – this is the product you use to give the paint better adhesion and keep the paint from peeling off.

How to use it

Using the Extra Bond is really simple because there are no extra steps involved!
To use, you mix your milk paint according to the directions (add water and powder together) and then add your Extra Bond and mix.  Its important to mix up your milk paint 1st and then add the bond.  If you add the bond directly to your powder and then add water, it will be a clumpy mess.
When i know that i will be adding the bond, i do make my milk paint mixture slightly thicker than i would normally.  The bond wont thin out your paint too much, but it may just a little.  If it still too thick after adding the bond, you are fine to add more water.  The consistency should still be the same as if just using milk paint alone would (see tutorial here on mixing milk paint and getting the right consistency).
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond
The directions call for adding 2 parts paint to one part of bond.  So if i have a cup of mixed paint, then i add a half cup of bond.   A lot of times when i know that i need bond, but i still want chipping, i add half or even a quarter of what the directions call for and that normally works.  Ive found in most cases that the Extra – Bond really makes the paint stick and i get very little to no natural chipping whatsoever.  If you have a surface that is a little iffy and think that you will need more bond, you can add up to a 1 to 1 ratio, so if you have one cup of paint, you can add 1 cup of bond.
Extra – Bond only needs to be used on the 1st coat of paint.  When using the bond in your 1st coat, it is recommended that you wait 2 hours before applying the 2nd coat of milk paint.  If you re-coat sooner, it may re-activate the bond from the 1st coat and cause the 1st coat to lift.  I don’t always wait the 2 hours and I’ve never really ran into this problem.
It is recommended that before painting with the milk paint/bond, that you thoroughly clean the surface 1st to remove all dirt and oils.  You need to use a good cleaner that wont leave behind an oily residue.  A product such as TSP works great for this.  If you use Extra – Bond over certain oil marks or dirt, or whatever foreign product that may be on the surface, the paint may stick in the beginning (or not) but may eventually begin to peel up.  You don’t want to paint a piece and a month later the milk paint begin to peel because its resisting the surface on the piece.  If you have properly prepped your piece prior to using the bond, the milk paint will not begin to peel down the road.
And the best part about using the Extra – Bond, you don’t need to prep your piece by sanding!!  The bond does the work for you!  That’s one of the main reasons i love working with milk paint.  It should be noted though, that if you are painting a piece with a high shine to it, that you lightly scuff sand it to knock down the shine and give the piece a little “tooth” for the paint to better adhere.
It is important to not let the bond freeze as it will no longer be usable.  Its also recommended to use it above 60 degrees so that the bond can cure.
Milk paint with the bond added will only last you a few hours especially if left uncovered.  It will start to gel and will no longer be usable – that’s why its important to only mix up what you will need with the 1st coat.

When & Why to use it

Like i said above, it is recommended that you use Extra – Bond when painting over a previously finished piece (polyurethane, shellac, waxed) or something that has already been painted.  Same goes for painting over laminate, metal or glass.  Basically if it has any bit of shine to it, that’s when i determine if i am going to use the bond.  You can paint cheap laminated Ikea type furniture with it as well (although i would sand it 1st to give it some tooth and add more Extra – Bond than recommended).
Also – if you want the look of milk paint, but don’t want a chippy, distressed finish then you would want to use the Extra – Bond.

- Previously painted -

In this case, the dresser was painted with a thick coat of an oil based paint and was pretty shiny and i knew the milk paint would just flake off if i didn’t use the bond.  I also didn’t want to see the yellow showing through in my final finish.  If the paint had of been a flat finish and a darker color, such as brown or black, i would have skipped the bond.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond
Remember though, even when using the bond, your 1st coat of milk paint will only be as good as the finish that may already be on the piece.  In this case, the paint was in really bad shape on the sides and a lot of it had to be scraped off so that my milk paint wouldn’t just flake off with the peeling paint.  Milk paint even with the bond added is not going to make a bad peeling paint job go away.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond

- Previous Finish -

These are just a couple examples of pieces i have painted in the last few weeks that have a previous finish to them.  The tall dresser is a newer piece and has a clear coat of lacquer from the factory, its pretty shiny and not porous at all.  The 70′ies dresser is all wood, but has a super thick coat of shiny smooth lacquer.
Both of these pieces if just painted with milk paint alone would most likely just flake off.  And i didn’t want a chippy finish on either of them so i added the Extra – Bond.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond
You can see how shiny the old finish of the dresser was, milk paint with bond covers it right up with no prep work!!
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond

- Skipping the Extra – Bond -

In the pic below, you can see what a finish looks like when bond wasn’t used.  This frame had a super thick shiny coat in most places and i wanted a chippy look.  So i skipped the bond and just sanded off the peeling paint after it dried because it resisted the smooth finish to give me the chippy look.
Milk paint is funny and unpredictable when not using the bond.  In some places it stuck like crazy and cant even be scraped off and in some places the paint just peeled right up.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond
This piece here had a semi-shiny old finish on it on most of the piece.  It was an older piece and i wanted the chippy look.  The milk paint did its thing like i wanted and chipped really well on both the top and bottom moldings.  But on the body of the chest, the milk paint didn’t chip much at all where the surface was a little more porous and the milk paint absorbed better so i had to manually distress it.
Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond
On this last piece, the finish was all gone and was very porous.  I knew that the milk paint would just get sucked up by the wood so i skipped the bond.  Because the milk paint adhered so well, i didn’t get any chipping and had to distress with my electric sander.

Sweet Pickins Milk Paint - Extra Bond……………………………………………….

I always think its important to have the Extra – Bond on hand, especially when 1st starting out with milk paint.  Milk paint is known for its unpredictability especially when skipping the bond, so by adding the bond you will have better control over the final results of your piece.
I would say that i only use bond about 25% of the time overall.  Sometimes i use it on every piece i do in a week, sometimes i will go a couple weeks without using it – it really just depends on the types of pieces that im working on.   I prefer the chippy look on a majority of my pieces so a lot of times i take a chance and skip the bond – sometimes it doesn’t work out so well and i have to go back and paint again with the bond!

Post by Sausha

Thursday, April 17, 2014

How To Use Sweet Pickins Extra Bond with Sweet Pickins Milk Paint

It's true I love Sweet Pickins Milk Paint.  For 6 years I painted most of my furniture with latex.  I tried other paints too but I always went back to latex paint.  The one problem I was having is I could distress with latex but I couldn't get the old chippy look.  I wanted do what takes nature many years to achieve.  Worn and loved pieces.    

Sweet Pickins paint is so fun to work with but there is un-predictability with this paint.  I've had a few pieces where it all chipped off.  Yes, it can be disheartening to have it all chip off but you can repaint it.  If your a type "A" person and like to have all you ducks in row so to speak.  I'm a reformed type"A" and I get it.  It still creeps back sometimes.  Living with a chronic illness has taught me a lot!  I understand your plight.  Especially when comes to painting.

What I recommend when you purchase your Sweet Pickins Milk Paint is to buy the Extra Bond.  This is how I was able to get used to the paint.





Add water and stir.  I usually use a craft stick and a plastic cup.


For a half cup of paint I use a tablespoon or so and mix it right in the paint.  What I have learned is to start with Extra Bond and then slowly taper off.  I started off with some nesting tables and put a 1/4 of cup of bond into about 1 cup of paint. That was a lot of bond.  They barely distressed or chipped.   

Tips for using bond:

1.  You only have to use the bond on the first coat.  The second coat doesn't have bond in it.
2.  If you leave your paint for more than 30-45 you may need to add a little more bond for your first coat.  The bond loses its bonding ability the longer it stays out.
3.  If you want a light distressed look light sand.  Use 220.  Heavily distressed use 180.
4.  If you want a chippy finish or more distressing use a less bond.  Use a paint scraper..  Use small pulling motions.  If you do big strokes you can end with big scratches that may not be your look.  You can buy it at local hardware store.

Porous surfaces- raw wood.  Raw wood won't chip or distress much.  The paint soaks into the wood.  It gives a more stained color look.

Non-porous surfaces- Painted wood, glass, metal, or Polyurethaned or varnished pieces are more likely to chip and distress.  If you choose not to use Sweet Pickins Extra Bond on these type of materials you can have were it's really chippy or all chips off.  Sometimes I choose to go that way.   

In this situation I usually add a splash of bond.  If it is a high gloss piece of furniture or really old varnish I use bond 1/4 cup to 1 1/2 cups of paint. I can always go back and us a paint scraper.  If you want no chippy at all use all use up to 1/2 cup of Extra Bond to 1.5 cups of paint. 

I have painted over many previously painted pieces and haven't had to use much bond. 

Pieces I've done with Sweet Pickins Milk Paint.


No Extra Bond 


This had thick shiny varnish on this bookshelf.  I used Extra Bond on this.

Extra Bond Used and then sanded.


Extra Bond Used.


No Extra Bond used.  This had been sanded before so there was raw wood exposed.  Gives a more stained look.

Used Extra Bond just a little bit.  


No bonded used.  Very old varnish and I was able to get a very chippy finish.


Used Extra Bond.

Hopefully this answers a lot of questions.  Sweet Pickins Milk Paint is amazing.  You can get many different looks with one type of paint.  I love that about this paint.  If you have any questions, feel free comment below.

Be Your Own Kind Of Beautiful.


Debbi